This page needs to be updated with demonstrating pictures as it is quite difficult to explain all the moves in text. :)

Kennetjie is a traditional game played by the Afrikaners and it is actually a two-team game with 8 players in each team.

However, as with cricket, there is no reason why it cannot be played by as little as two players.

The nice thing about Kennetjie, is that it has a lot of variation in launching the kennetjie and some of the moves are really difficult.

The rules below, are not the full official tournament rules, but a shortened version for fun.

As equipment, you only need two sticks. A short one of about 100mm long and about 25mm thick, and a long straight one about as long as a cricket bat.The short stick is called the "kennetjie".

Take your camping knife and strip the bark of the sticks as this may start to come loose from the knocks.

Make a hole in the ground of about 3cm deep and 15cm long.

The following sequence of events is followed each time a new player becomes the batsman. To choose the first batsman of the game, you can be creative as you like.

Stage 1

The batsman takes the kennetjie and puts it in the middle accross the hole in the ground. The tip of the long stick is placed in the hole and the player now needs to flick the kennetjie as far as possible away from him.

The other players are placed in defensive positions around the batsman and tries to catch the kennetjie before it hits the ground. If a player catch the kennetjie, he becomes the batsman.

If none of the field workers can catch the kennetjie, the batsman needs to place the long stick across the hole and the field workers each gets a chance to throw the kennetjie from the last position and try to hit the long stick. The first player that manage to hit the long stick, becomes the batsman.

If none of the field workers can attempt to hit the long stick, the batsman takes the long stick and place the kennetjie on his hand where the long stick is griped by the thumb and forefinger, so that it forms a cross. It looks almost like a sword. He then flips the short stick in the air, and needs to hit it with the bat as far as possible away from him. If he misses, he is out and the field workers run for the hole. The first one to reach the hole, is the new batsman.

Stage 2

If the batsman, however, do manage to hit the kennetjie and none of the field workers can catch it, the closest field worker gets a change to try and throw the kennetjie in the hole, from the last resting position. The batsman needs to defend the hole and tries to hit the kennetjie while it is still airborne.

Now the real fun starts and the following general rules applies:

  1. If the kennetjie hits the ground and not the hole, the batsman needs to measure the distance from the hole in stick lengths.
  2. If the kennetjie is airborne after it is hit by the bat, a field worker can catch the batsman out.
  3. If the kennetjie comes to rest without a field worker catching it, the closest field worker tries to throw it into the hole.
  4. When a field worker throws the kennetjie to the hole, the batsman needs to defend the hole.

Regardless if the batsman could hit the kennetjie or not, after an attempt by a field worker to hit the hole, the following applies for Right handed players and is inverted for Left handed players:

  1. If the kennetjie is within one stick length of the hole, the batsman is out and the field worker who did the trick, is the new batsman. If in the actions that follows here after, the batsman misses the kennetjie, he is out.
  2. Within two stick lengths (Voetjie): The kennetjie is placed on the toes of the left foot, flipped in the air and hit  with the bat.
  3. Within three stick lengths (Tip-Top): The kennetjie is held with the left hand and must be flipped in the air with the long stick and hit as far away as possible.
  4. Within four stick lengths (Bokhoringkie): The kennetjie is placed on the ring finger and thumb flipped in the air and hit with the bat.
  5. Within five stick lengths (Elmbogie): The kennetjie is placed on the elbow of the left arm, flipped in the air and hit with the bat.
  6. Within six stick lengths (Ogie): The kennetjie is placed on the left eye, flipped in the air and hit with the bat.
  7. Within seven stick lengths (Oortjie): The kennetjie is placed on the left ear, flipped in the air and hit with the bat.
  8. Within eight stick lengths (Kennetjie): The kennetjie is places on the chin, flipped in the air and hit with the bat.
  9. Within nine stick lengths or more: The batsman gets and extra life. The player with the most lives wins and a live can be used to play again if he is out.

If the batsman drops the kennetjie in any of the above moves, the field worker who made the last throw, becomes the batsman.